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Contained in the cattle-worshipping African tribe that makes use of cow urine to scrub their faces and bleach their hair

Inside the cattle-worshipping African tribe that uses cow urine to wash their faces and bleach their hair


FASCINATING pictures present an African tribe the place members use URINE to scrub their faces and bleach their hair.

Compelling pictures reveal the day by day rituals of the cattle-worshipping Mundari tribe, together with one which reveals a younger boy coated in ashes from hearth with one other smearing the dung of the Ankole Watusi cattle on the bottom.

A Mundari boy washing his head with urine of cattle
mediadrumimages / Trevor Cole
A member of the Mundari tribe covering himself in ashes of fire
A member of the Mundari tribe masking himself in ashes of fireplace
mediadrumimages / Trevor Cole

Different pictures depict the massive dimension of the cattle’s horns which may develop as much as 72 inches in size, while one other reveals a boy washing himself with the animal’s urine.

The unbelievable photographs have been taken in one of many cattle camps in South Sudan by journey photographer Trevor Cole from Londonderry, Northern Eire,.

Trevor stated: “Capturing at daybreak and nightfall is ideal as all of the cattle are in place. 

“The extra you see, the extra you realise that there’s an inextricable bond between the tribe and their cattle.

“The way in which they lead them, rub ash into their skins, attend to their wants, use their milk, dung and urine.

“They acquire the dung deposited in a single day and unfold it on the bottom, a few of it’s used to coat the cattle horns with a veneer of manure.

“We watched as boys immersed their heads within the circulation of recent urine from the cattle. 

“The end result of that is to utilize a pure antiseptic and to alter their hair color to purple and even bleached blonde.”

A Mundari boy protected by his mother
A Mundari boy protected by his mom
mediadrumimages / Trevor Cole
An ash-covered Mundari man smoking a pipe
An ash-covered Mundari man smoking a pipe
mediadrumimages / Trevor Cole
A Mundari tribesman caresses the gigantic horns of a bull
A Mundari tribesman caresses the big horns of a bull
mediadrumimages / Trevor Cole

At night time Trevor recalled how they slept with their cattle to guard them and so they carried Kalashnikovs to take action. 

Cattle rustling is commonplace and is a reason for battle.

He stated: “The Ankole Watusi cattle have the most important horns I’ve ever seen and the most important of the cattle could also be price $500.

“In the course of the day, the cattle disperse from the banks of the Nile into the lengthy grasses of the alluvial floodplain. 

“They return at nightfall instinctively.”

Mundari boys wrestling
Mundari boys wrestling
mediadrumimages / Trevor Cole
Young herders pictured at sunset
Younger herders pictured at sundown
mediadrumimages / Trevor Cole

A member of the tribe gathering dung from the ground
mediadrumimages / Trevor Cole

A member of the tribe gathering dung from the bottom[/caption]


Theirs is a symbiotic relationship the place there’s an understanding of the cattle which matches past regular animal husbandry.

They take pleasure of their animals and the entire neighborhood of man and beast is interconnected.

The Mundari tribe are a small ethnic group of South Sudan and one of many Nilotic indigenous teams. 

The neighborhood is made up of cattle-herders and agriculturalists and are a part of Karo folks, which additionally consists of Bari, Pojulu, Kakwa, Kuku and Nyangwara.

Their native language is Kutuk na Mundari. Like many different Nilotic tribes, the Mundari are very cattle-oriented: the animal serves as meals, a type of foreign money and a mark of standing.

Trevor added: “An historic mist, trapped in time, the place tribal traits and traditions are perpetuated within the twenty-first century.

“These historic practices guarantee concord with the atmosphere and have a small ecological footprint which is native and ensures cultural longevity.

“These folks have a really sustainable existence and their reference to nature ought to be a message to us all.”

A Mundari matriarch
A Mundari matriarch
mediadrumimages / Trevor Cole
A stunning shot revealing the true size of the Ankole Watusi cattle.
A shocking shot revealing the true dimension of the Ankole Watusi cattle
mediadrumimages / Trevor Cole

A young Mundari man holding a horn
mediadrumimages / Trevor Cole

A younger Mundari man holding a horn[/caption]

A Mundari cattle-herder among goat
A Mundari cattle-herder amongst goat
mediadrumimages / Trevor Cole