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Newly-discovered footage reveals the final Tasmanian tiger prowling round its cage in 1935

Newly-discovered footage shows the last Tasmanian tiger prowling around its cage in 1935


NEWLY-released footage captures the last-known transferring photos of the final Tasmanian tiger prowling a zoo cage 85 years in the past.

Shot in 1935, the wonderful clip emerged after it was digitally restored by specialists from the Nationwide Movie and Sound Archive of Australia.

Nationwide Movie and Sound Archive of Australia

The footage captures the last-known transferring photos of the final Tasmanian tiger[/caption]

The 21-second section comes from a travelogue known as ‘Tasmania the Wonderland’ believed to have been shot by filmmaker and exhibitor Sidney Prepare dinner.

It captures Benjamin – the last-known surviving thylacine  – at Beaumaris Zoo in Hobart, Tasmania.

The very fact the video was shot in 1935 makes it the newest transferring photos of the now extinct animal.

Benjamin died simply 18 months after this startling footage was captured.

His dying marked the extinction of the species after one other specimen died at London Zoo in 1931.

Thylacines had been massive carnivorous marsupials which appeared like a cross between a wolf and an enormous cat.

Thylacines were large carnivorous marsupials which looked like a cross between a wolf and a big cat.
Nationwide Movie and Sound Archive of Australia

Thylacines had been massive carnivorous marsupials which appeared like a cross between a wolf and an enormous cat[/caption]

Benjamin died just 18 months after the footage was captured
Nationwide Movie and Sound Archive of Australia

Benjamin died simply 18 months after the footage was captured in 1935[/caption]

The slow-moving predators hunted kangaroos in addition to different marsupials, rodents and small birds.

They as soon as lived all through Australia however grew to become extinct on the mainland round 2,000 years in the past.

It was then confined to the island of Tasmania till they had been ultimately killed off by canine and hunters.

On the clip Benjamin could be seen pacing round whereas two males rattle his cage.

The narrator says the beast “is now very uncommon, being pressured out of its pure habitat by the march of civilization.”

“The shortage of thylacine footage makes each second of transferring picture actually valuable,” mentioned NFSA Curator Simon Smith.


“We’re very excited to make this newly-digitised footage accessible to everybody on-line.”

Regardless of its extinction, Tasmania’s Division of Main Industries, Parks, Water and Surroundings launched a doc in October detailing eight reported sightings in recent times.

Nevertheless, there was no arduous proof to help the claims .